Tag Archives: French

Simone Porte Jacquemus set to launch men’s line

Simon Porte Jacquemus has finally revealed his new professional challenge that he has been hinting at on his social media: the launch of his very own menswear line.

The designer announced the news at his Paris fall show by taking a bow in a sweatshirt that read “New Job L’Homme Jacquemus” at his women’s ready-to-wear show.

He won’t be presenting his first creations until Paris men’s fashion week in June, and it has yet to be determined if he will have a show or a presentation for the line.

“I see the Jacquemus man as I see the Jacquemus woman: it’s a sincere story,” Jacquemus told WWD:

“I didn’t do men’s until now because I didn’t feel the need to do men’s and I couldn’t imagine it. I fell in love and I started to imagine that the Jacquemus man exists. I did Jacquemus women’s for my mother, and while I’m not saying that the men’s collection will be all about my boyfriends, it will still always be a love story.”

The designer has used social media as the main outlet for communications since he launched his brand in 2009 after dropping out of fashion school due to his mother’s death (Jacquemus is her maiden name).

Since then, Jacquemus has become one of the most talented young designers on the Paris stage.

Jacquemus has predicted that adding a men’s line would change the mood of the brand. “This is going to change Jacquemus a little in the sense that it’s much more forward-looking, because there is a lot of melancholy in the women’s collections, for obvious reasons,” he said.

Fosun International buys France’s oldest fashion house

The Chinese powerhouse Fosun International has recently bought a majority stake in the French fashion brand Lanvin.

The purchase was announced in a statement this past Thursday. The Shanghai company owns a wide range of brands including Club Med resorts and the men’s label Caruso.

Lanvin, founded in 1899, is the oldest fashion house in France. The brand has been bought by Shaw-Lan Wang in 2001, which turned it into a global brand.

Chinese businesses are looking to expand their portfolio of luxury European brands. Back in January, it was revealed that Shandong Ruyi Group were the leading bidders for the Swiss luxury handbag company Bally. The French crystal maker Baccarat was bought by the Chinese group, Fortune Fountain Capital in June last year.

According to the firm, Bain & Co., luxury sales have grown in China by 20 percent last year, with a third of the sales coming from Chinese consumers.

Zadig & Volataire bring street French twist to New York Fashion Week

New York Fashion Week usually encapsulates bedlam, but for one French label, it’s very very different. An hour before the Zadig & Voltaire’s runway show, models, dressers, hair and makeup stylists were still prepping to make sure the show ran smoothly.

“I’m a perfectionist,” said Cecilia Bönström, 47, the brand’s artistic director.  “Even though I have a creative job, I like everything to be really clear; I like to follow a schedule.”

Zasig & Voltaire is a French brand that prides itself on offering styles that are filled with streetwise edge and easiness.

“This season, my message is to confirm that Zadig & Voltaire is the contemporary rock ‘n’ roll brand,” Bönström explained. “For me, the girls are very delicate but, at the same time, very rock. There are a lot of legs, a lot of skin. There are leather and knitwear with perfect, sexy cocktail dresses.”

This year, Zadig & Voltaire is celebrating its 20th anniversary, a benchmark that is rarely ever achieved, especially in luxury fashion. With fashion fluctuating now that more of the spending habits have shifted, many labels are struggling to keep a grip on the fashion world. The reason Zadig & Voltaire’s does so well is that even when there are trends coming and going, the company sticks to its core aesthetic and value, something the label’s founder, Thierry Gillier, learned very early on:

“When I came to America, on Madison Avenue, it was very difficult. Everything was more classic than what we were showing. Slowly, that changed. The look today is very inspired by the street. For me, it was obvious that the fashion business would change. The clothes were very stiff and rigid, and I wanted to make it more relaxed.”

Luxury Travels High

While it is the season to head to hot spots such as Mykonos and Ibiza, it calls for changing time zones in style.

Topping the list with its classical charm, the Goyard Palace trunk is the must have personalized accessory this season. With its exceptional heritage, Goyard is a drawn inspiration that stands uniquely amongst other fleeting trends. Goyard labels itself as a timeless design that will appeal to customers looking for uncompromising exclusivity, unparalleled craftsmanship and aesthetic refinement.

Goyard offers four distinct product lines:

• Travel goods: Goyard provides travelers with all the accessories needed for a stylish getaway such as; trunks, hard-sided luggage, trolley cases, vanity cases, hat cases or weekender bags.

• For men and women: Goyard offers a large choice of handbags, tote bags, pouches, briefcases and clutches with an equally large range of matching accessories: wallets, change purses, diary and check-book covers, and business-card holders.

• Personalized orders: Goyard personalizes trunks and luggage. Each piece is unique and entirely hand-made, just like in the 19th century.

• Pet accessories: The « Chic du Chien » line was launched in the late 19th century by Edmond Goyard. It features collars, leashes, bowls and dishes for pets, and is sold exclusively at the Chic du Chien boutique, 352, rue Saint-Honoré in Paris.

The long-lasting sustainability of Goyard products is a plus since the line doesn’t change every season.

via facebook/goyard
via facebook/goyard

 

 

Breton Stripes: Classic French Style

The swing of the fashion world away from Americana and toward Italian sensibilities has led to an explosion of bold styling, an experimentation with color and pattern born thoroughly of Continental taste.  Yet the Italians shouldn’t get all the love.  Overlooked as they sometimes are, the French have been formidable contributors to men’s fashion over the years- it’s no accident that Paris puts on runway shows for men as well as women.  France, as a whole, loves striking, memorable design, something that stands out, something that reveals the good taste of the wearer.  The pattern we call Breton stripes is drawn from this love of the bold, and to this day it is a worthy choice for any FashionMR in search of a casual statement piece.

The Breton stripe, as its name suggests, originated in Brittany, though not in the way one might think.  Though it became a province of France in 1532, Brittany has long maintained an independent streak, perhaps due to its history of changing hands between France and England.  This nationalism is exemplified by the Brittany flag: instead of a colorful design, it is starkly black and white, black stripes on a white background, with a canton like ermine fur in the upper-left corner.

Though originating in Brittany, the Breton stripe became completely French in 1858, when an Act of France designated that white shirts with black stripes would be the official upper garment of sailors in the French Navy.  As so often happens with military wear, what started on seamen soon grew ubiquitous among all sailors and mariners, and then became just as commonplace on land.  In the 1950’s it crossed the Atlantic through the efforts of great artists such as Andy Warhol and Pablo Picasso, and though it has not always enjoyed roaring popularity, it remains to this day a solidly famous garment.

The Breton stripe can be worn as a sweater or a shirt.  In both forms, it is always a crewneck, and almost always long-sleeved, in keeping with its maritime traditions.  Though typically white with black stripes, navy stripes have become popular, and even red stripes occasionally appear.  Some makers even invert the colors, creating black shirts with white stripes.  Whatever permutation you select, you cannot go wrong with the Breton stripe shirt or sweater as a casual garment.  Wear it indoors in the Winter, and as Spring arrives take it outside with a pair of chinos or some shorts.  It is simple, bold, and has heritage- everything a FashionMR could ask for.

John Lawrence Sullivan Fall/Winter 2014-15

 

JLS takes us on a fabric journey from basic gray wool’s, to space age foam and Macintosh style shirts and coats. He starts off with a simple gray wool two piece low cut suit with the jacket having a one button closure that is on a black sateen diagonal strap sewn onto the jacket. He then goes on to show off some sateen shirt style jackets with outlines and chest patch pockets. What is really interesting about this look is that the jacket is so thin that it looks like another low cut shirt that’s tucked into the pants. Only then you realize that it’s a jacket tucked into the pants, which is another style statement in itself. The journey then continues on to a patterned look and feel comprising of rugby designed faux-fur sweaters in blue and black, and burgundy and black colors. Keeping with the patterned theme he then shows off some gingham patterns and besom pockets in his red, and blue single breasted suits. Now he gets to the space age materials, making blue and burgundy duffle coats from foam and fiber materials with rubber hooks, patch pockets and epaulets on the sleeves. Finally comes the truly unique look. A charcoal two piece PVC material suit that if worn in the rain will be the best feeling in the world. Everyone else running, and you are just strolling along waterproofed like there is no rain at all.

Color Study: Orange

Today we’ll look at the color orange, a worthy addition to any FashionMR’s wardrobe, particularly in this time of year.

Orange is a warm color, but not a hot one.  It is the color of the rising and the setting sun, but not the sun at noon.  It doesn’t make us wince away in its brilliance as yellow does; rather, orange is an inviting warmth, drawing us closer, making us slow down and bask in the comforting heat.  Orange lacks the immediacy of red.  It is a complex color, a considerate color, requiring more study than its other warm shades.  Yet orange is still bright, and still sturdy.  Its harmony with the falling leaves makes it suited for the outdoors, giving it a rustic, sporting aesthetic.  Anyone who has hunted quail will connect orange with the reflective vests used to identify hunters in the field.  Like them, a FashionMR who wears orange will be noticed without fail, and the scrutiny he will endure means the piece he chooses must be able to stand up to careful examination.

Orange is not a color that should dominate a wardrobe.  It is so sturdy and bright that a single item of it in an ensemble is enough to capture attention.  We suggest picking a piece that you feel comfortable showing off.  A sweater is an easy choice: wear an orange sweater under your navy blazer with brown pants for an ideal Autumn wardrobe.  It will make you appear warm and confident in the cold days to come.  On the other hand, you can go the Ivy League route and wear orange trousers.  Pair them with a gray tweed sport coat and a white shirt and you’ll be the toast of any party.  If you feel uncomfortable sporting orange in such a broad fashion, you can even wear something simpler.  An orange necktie will look good, particularly with blue, its complimentary color.  Hurry, though- Fall will be over before you know it.