Tag Archives: NYFW

The Importance of Men’s Body Positivity

As body positivity for women continues to expand every day for women on the internet, in stores and just in everyday conversation the conversation hasn’t necessarily shifted towards talking about body positivity for men. While more and more plus sized women break into the world of fashion and modeling the landscape is still not set for plus sized men to make their push into the forefront. When it comes to covers of magazines and runway shows this most recent New York Fashion Week incorporated a decent amount of plus-sized women’s models the men were somewhat nonexistent with only about one being featured for Asos. Asos already has a section of their website dedicated to plus-sized men and women and are taking strides in giving them fashionable options without shaming them for their bodies.

The importance of men’s body positivity when it comes to fashion is that in the fashion you want clothes that will fit cleanly and look good overall different types of body types, because you are marketing not just to people who are into fashion that are thin. A lot of people personally struggle with coming to terms that the fashion they may love and admire may not be something they can never wear. When you create a collection or a product most designers want whoever appreciates their art and image to be able to purchase and wear their product. This isn’t always the case though when it comes to high fashion designers who mostly model their clothes not just after women that are far thinner and taller than the average woman but for men that have unachievable body standards. For men, I feel it comes in a much different light than for women but male models usually consist of two different body types lean and muscular or just very thin. This becomes an issue for plus sized men when they are online and in-store shopping because they see a product on the rack or on a website and immediately know that this garment will not drape over their body the way the designer intended it to.

The whole stigma that comes with being plus sized in the world today is one that can be very degrading for people. It is something that will affect one’s confidence and the way they try to portray themselves too the world and the least they deserve is to feel confident and comfortable in the clothes they wear. The responsibility of promotion of a positive outlook on plus-sized men and women comes on that of the designers, magazines and clothing companies to find a niche for these people who still definitely have a huge voice and impact on the world of fashion. What companies like Asos providing fashion-forward options and opportunities to not just plus sized women but men even including them in their fashion week runways is something a lot of companies should take notes from. It’s going to take the effort of not just one company to change the outlook on plus-sized men in fashion and just body positivity for men in general, but I think with the trend of body positivity when it comes to women things are moving in the right direction.

Alexander Wang is leaving New York Fashion Week

New York Fashion Week has lost longtime designer Alexander Wang. Starting this summer, he is moving his shows from the February and September schedules and place them in June and December. The move is likely to place his designs closer to pre-collection season.

According the company’s announcement, the move “is widely considered to be a transformative solution for the global industry, breaking out of the conventional fashion calendar.” The move also includes combining the pre-collection and main collections into one single collection, thus dividing the label’s products into monthly drops.

In terms of what the new change affects, the new schedule will shorten the time for purchases to four months after the show rather than the former span of six months. This also means that there will not be any ready-to-wear shows from Alexander Wang anytime soon.

The move will also shrink New York Fashion Week, which will likely affect a major portion of local industries such as hotels, restaurants, transportation and florists.

Wang will be the fifth New York designer of his generation to part ways with the official NYFW schedule.

Key Representation Throughout Men’s NYFW SS 2018

During the past month, the men’s NYFW for the Spring/Summer 2018 Collections have been breaking the fashion industry by storm with the quality and meaning behind multiple of the collections.

The HEAD OF STATE designer, Taofeek Abijako, particularly left critics astounded by his designs throughout his SS ’18 collection. He managed to create a social impact through cultural designs and concepts behind the collection of the season. The theme revolved around the colonialism in West Africa. The inspiration for this concept came from multiple African contemporary photographers and artists. Some of the influencers of the designs consist of Clic Clac Baby, Malick Sidibe, and Samuel Fosso. The HEAD OF STATE SS ’18 season collection wanted to capture how normality in society has returned in West Africa through multiple efforts but wanted to feature an elegance and soulful manner that represented the birth of all nations throughout West Africa. This collection mainly revolved around multiple different aspects, which this collection was known for during men’s NYFW. It included skillful color blocking throughout the designs and the pairing of a new sense of street style. As this collection has includes a wonderful representation of multiple cultures and nations the fashion industry has to wonder what is coming next from Taofeek Abijako’s HEAD OF STATE brand.

Raun Larose featured a different design throughout the SS ’18 collection. This collection’s inspiration revolved around the 1980s. The representation for this seasons designs was to show how technology on the mass cultural ideal influences society. Raun Larose wanted this season to symbolize multiple themes throughout the collection. The apparent themes were to show a romanticized, nerdy, and extremely exaggerated collection in the modern era. Some articles of clothing that revolved around the 80s featured oversized jackets and pants in multiple unique shapes. Progressive fabrics were used to symbolize the increasing artificiality and virtual reality of society. Inorganic materials were used to give the collection a retro-futuristic feeling. An artist named Jose Chunà designed stripes for the collection to reference towards a computer screen about to crash. This collections main theory is to question the future and where society is headed within technology.

Another brand that took a different approach to the fashion industry is C2H4. For the SS ’18 NYFW, this brand’s feature collection was called “Zero Gravity.” The designer’s vision was for chemists on Mars. This was to resemble a laboratory work wear collection for chemists in the year 2082. Feature pieces included laboratory coats, utility vests, and multifunctional anorak. Bottoms consisted of technical sweatpants, pocketed cargo pants, and side-strap track pants. This collection wanted to represent saturated and monochromatic color schemes to boost certain colors such as multiple blues, reds, and urban yellows.

Issey Miyake Debuts His New Scent During NYFW

A melange of all things sensual and alluring, Issey Miyake introduces a seductive cologne during New York Fashion Week entitled “Nuit D’Issey”. A mix of all things necessary in a fragrance, Miyake seems to have hit the perfect balance between light and dark. The light bergamot gives off a very sweet and citrus aroma which is backed with just a hint of black pepper giving a unique pinch to the users nose. But given that light cologne wears off quite easily, Miyake gives the fragrance a firm background of black woods and vetiver, giving the cologne a strong woody essence, effectively allowing the user to have the scent attached to him throughout the day.

The presentation of the cologne is striking as well, given that the bottle was designed and modeled with the help of visual artist Ryan Hopkinson. Together, Miyake and Hopkinson capture the elements of night. The bottle has quite a smokey gradient to it, reminiscent to that of the moonlight, while the box has a similar dual tone.

But the cologne itself is not perfect, nor can it be. The idea of perfection is one that men chase but can never catch up to, and with that being said Miyake has come quite close to having an ideal, well rounded scent that anyone and everyone can enjoy, giving it the status that is a step towards perfection. If I had to give a rating to the scent, it would be a solid 8/10. On my recommendation, I feel that this is a perfect cologne for a working man. After running around all day for Fashion Week, one would imagine that they would need a spritz of cologne before they begin attending the after parties, but I find that while wearing “Nuit D’Issey”, I do not need to apply that second air. The cologne stays strong through a rough day and would fit the criteria for any professional, boss, or boyfriend that has little time for themselves. It would be a great gift considering that it is well worth the money you pay for a cologne.

via Nuit D'Issey
via Nuit D’Issey

 

 

Ricardo Seco Presents His S/S15 Collection At NYFW

A mix of all things colorful and bold, Ricardo Seco presents his S/S 15 collection “DREAMS”. On the tenth floor of 7 World Trade Center, the designer presented a slew of classic silhouettes mixed with colorful essentials in his brand new collaboration with New Balance. The designer states that this isn’t just a collaboration with New Balance but ” with the Wixárika, an indigenous community from Mexico, who are known for their beadings.” He goes on to state that the tribe creates “each bedded piece” that they “put their dreams into their work.”
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A chic mix of all things fashionable and trendy, the collection was the first time the designer displayed both mens and womens wear together. A mix of all things essential, the collection featured leather jackets, jumpsuits, swimsuits, shorts, pants and a few other things. A mixture of suede, neoprene, cotton and silk were among the fabrics present and all were perfectly constructed. Many elements and inspirations could be found among the designer line. Most important were the elements of Wixárika culture, such as trippy, peyote graphics and geometric designs based on the Eye of God mixed with a very New York vibe. It will not be surprising to see the clothing fly off the shelves next year and your favorite fashionistas rocking it next year.
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Images by Isaac Nho

 

 

Haze Collection S/S 2015

The story is simple, but the outcome is an architectural inspired eyewear collection that offers a distinctive mix of eclectic aesthetics and exceptional manufacturing quality.
For the Haze Collection S/S 2015 presentation during New York Fashion Week, the team brought together family, friends and loyal customers to not only reveal the latest line but to also try the pieces while enjoying an open bar and live music setting at the Hudson Hotel Pent House Tent.
The eyewear collection can be described in two words “Modernly Classic”. While you would find a vintage feel to most of the pieces, you will be interrupted with modern elements such as shield pieces or chrome lenses. The piece that stood as a forerunner in the Haze Collection S/S 2015 was in fact the Shield.
The Shield’s pattern is inspired by architecture from the Ming Dynasty, and is individually laser-cut into slices of gold-plated metal. While trying on the Shield during a fun photo booth session, I learned how functional it was because the shield was removable and was held in place with internal magnets, which facilitates the styling of choice.
So whether you are feeling the modern boldness or simply in the mood for a unique frame for the upper body display, Haze Collection will serve your feelings to the dot.
Haze Collection S/S 2015
Haze Collection S/S 2015
Haze Collection S/S 2015

New York Fashion Week S/S 2015 Street Style Day 2

Day 2 of Fashion Week was all about the blue. Whether it was dark, navy or bright blue many FashionMisters were wearing blue suits.  Unisex fashion was also very prevalent, skirts don’t only have to be for women. To add masculinity, they were paired with a sports jersey and a shirt and a bolo tie.

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What is a FashionMister?
“Someone who isn’t afraid of fashion.”

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“It’s all about the blue suits.”

 

Here are our favorites for day 2.

 

 

New York Fashion Week S/S 15 Street Style Day 1

New York Fashion Week is upon us. Outside of the Lincoln Center, men are looking more FashionMister than usual as they arrived to BCBG and Richard Chai’s shows. Most came dressed in traditional style suits with the added flair of a patterned button up. Others were a little more bold while embracing big splashes of color.

Here are our favorites for day 1.

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Photo by Ashley Zucker
FMR12
Photo by Ashley Zucker
FMR11
Photo by Ashley Zucker
FMR8
Photo by Ashley Zucker
FMR7
Photo by Ashley Zucker
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Photo by Ashley Zucker
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Photo by Ashley Zucker
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Photo by Ashley Zucker
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Photo by Ashley Zucker

I on Fashion: Elegance and the Sapeur

 Today I’m thinking about elegance—what it is, what it means, and what forms it can take.

    Much of our contemporary idea of elegance derives from the lifestyles and attire of the often frankly inelegant celebrities about whose lives we seem never to tire of hearing, and not only their fabulous vacations and torrid affairs but also the minutiae of their daily existence.

    Though the intensity of the modern West’s obsession with celebrity culture, and the massive cottage industry that has grown up around it, are wholly new, in matters of style the public has looked to distinguished individuals for guidance at least since the Duke of Windsor and Fred Astaire became synonymous with male elegance in the 1930s. And in this regard—elegance—it must be said that the paragons of yesteryear, whether heads of state or silver screen idols, outshone many of their latter-day counterparts.

    Michelle Obama wearing Junya Watanabe, adoring press notwithstanding, has style but lacks elegance. Carla Bruni, on the other hand, seems to have elegance in spades, as one might expect of a former model—yet she remains a model, wearing clothes well but without her own unifying aesthetic.

    What then is elegance? And what purpose does this palpable yet unquantifiable attribute serve, other than to aestheticize human existence and to draw the occasional admiring glance?

    These questions, never less than embers in my mind, were fanned into flame recently by my receipt of a rather astonishing photo book entitled Gentlemen of Bakongo: The Importance of Being Elegant. The subject of the book is sapeurs, the acolytes of a “religion of clothing” unique to the Congo, and the photographs depict real-life sapeurs in their native environment—the streets and open-air bars of Brazzaville and Kinshasa, the capital cities of the Republic of Congo and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, respectively, which lie in sight of one another on opposite sides of the Congo River.

    This book, as its title indicates, focuses exclusively on the sapeurs of the famous Bakongo neighborhood of Brazzaville. The photographer, Daniele Tamagni, has done an admirable job of capturing these rare birds in their often squalid environs. Indeed one might come away from her book with the impression that the streets of Congolese cities are positively crowded with peacocks young and old, nattily dressed in European finery.

    What youthful Japanese are often said to have removed from the Western styles of dress they’ve co-opted—namely, their emotional content—even while perfecting them to excess, these Congolese men have restored and heightened. Harajuku girls with more or less sunny dispositions may think nothing of draping themselves in black lace as Gothic lolitas, but for Congolese sapeurs elegance neither begins nor ends with colorful plumage.

    Tamagni writes, “Members [of SAPE] have their own code of honour, codes of professional conduct and strict notions of morality. It is a world within a world within a city. Respected and admired in their communities, today’s sapeurs see themselves as artists.” They are gentlemen, and although many younger sapeurs, unlike their forefathers, have organized themselves into competing gangs, they rarely brawl but instead engage in sartorial stand-offs, using their Sunday best as weapons.

    And yet many of these young men are unemployed or make pitifully small wages. Some must save up for months to buy a single designer ensemble. Many is the girlfriend and mother, one can imagine, who wishes that her lover or son would put his money toward more practical goals—like buying a house. Foolish as their indulgence in clothing they can scarcely afford may seem (and in fact is), it’s clear that sapeurs have found a way to transcend their filthy surroundings. That fashion is the vehicle for this transcendence does not invalidate either the goal or the achievement.

    It is easy sometimes for us to forget that money has no intrinsic value, and is useful only insofar as it can obtain for us goods and services that we need and desire. These things which money can buy, whether tangible possessions or intangible attainments such as an advanced education, do have value, either as means to an end or as ends in themselves. So although there is a sense in which the sapeurs, especially those in the younger generation—some of whom seem to compete with one another for gaudiest attire—dress to the nines for the sake of elegance alone, and although there is wisdom in urging them to use their incomes to better themselves, rather than merely their wardrobes, there is also much to be admired in the way they have forged, against the grain of their milieu, confident and unique self-identities.

    Forced to confront daily a world that offers them little encouragement or opportunity, the sapeurs don their elegant suits as a defense against poverty, hopelessness and death. And in so doing, they inspire the next generation to look beyond the dark world in which they are raised and dream of what might be.

 

I on Fashion: Elegance and the Sapeur
I on Fashion: Elegance and the Sapeur

 

I on Fashion: Elegance and the Sapeur
I on Fashion: Elegance and the Sapeur

 

I on Fashion: Elegance and the Sapeur
I on Fashion: Elegance and the Sapeur